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Elberfelder Bibel Schlachter 2000Interlinear NTNeue ÜbersetzungLatinvulgate BibelLuther Übersetzung

Young Literal English Bible Version

The Bible text designated YLT is from the 1898 Young's Literal Translation by Robert Young who also compiled Young's Analytical Concordance. It is an English-language Bible translation that is now in the public domain. YLT is an extremely literal translation that attempts to preserve the tense and word usage as found in the original Greek and Hebrew writings. The text was scanned from a reprint of the 1898 edition as published by Baker Book House, Grand Rapids Michigan. The book is still in print and may be ordered from Baker Book House. Obvious errors in spelling or inconsistent spellings of the same word were corrected in the computer edition of the text.

Young produced a "Revised Version" of the translation in 1887, which was based on the Westcott-Hort Text that was completed in 1885. There has been controversy surrounding the Westcott-Hort Text (which is no longer used in modern translations), among a small percentage of church goers who will only use the KJV, because of variations in the Greek manuscripts that appear in modern texts that were unknown at the time the Textus Receptus was published. After Robert Young died on October 14, 1888, the publisher released a new Revised Edition in 1898. This is the third and last edition that he produced.

The Literal Translation is unusual in that, as the name implies, it is a strictly literal translation of the original Hebrew and Greek texts. The Preface to the Second Edition states, If a translation gives a present tense when the original gives a past, or a past when it has a present; a perfect for a future, or a future for a perfect; an a for a the, or a the for an a; an imperative for a subjunctive, or a subjunctive for an imperative; a verb for a noun, or a noun for a verb, it is clear that verbal inspiration is as much overlooked as if it had no existence. THE WORD OF GOD IS MADE VOID BY THE TRADITIONS OF MEN. [Emphases in original.] Therefore, Young used the present tense in many places in which other translations use the past tense, particularly in narratives.

Young's translation of Gen.1.1-3 is closer to the Hebrew than the better-known versions of this passage in English. Young's usage of English present tense rather than past tense has been supported by scholars ranging from the medieval Jewish rabbi Rashi (who advised, "[I]f you are going to interpret [this passage] in its plain sense, interpret it thus: At the beginning of the creation of heaven and earth, when the earth was (or the earth being) unformed and void . . . God said, ‘Let there be light.’") to Richard Elliott Friedman in his translation of the Five Books in "The Bible with Sources Revealed" (2002).

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Translation uses the same Elizabethian language that the Schlachter 2000 uses. However, being a strictly literal translation, the word order is different from the KJV, so it does read different than the KJV and can be difficult at times to read. Being a strictly literal translation makes it the perfect study tool. You can now see exactly what God said and how He said it. There is no changing of words, no softening of words or passages, just translated strictly as it was written in the original languages. This translation will allow the reader to see exactly what God said and will allow a more precise study of the Bible. How can a reader study a Bible when the translators have have interpreted instead of translated? The vast number of modern translation interpret (tell you what they thought God meant) instead of translate (tell you what God actually said). When Robert Young translated this edition, he was not trying to please or appease someone, he was not trying to be politically correct, he was not translating in an attempt to rewrite the Bible to fit his theological beliefs. With this Bible, you get the word of God and nothing but the word of God.

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